14" Disc Hiller with 22" Shank, Blanton Style Hub

#30525

$31.99 EA

A Blanton style disc hiller assembly has 4 square bolts to create a secure bond to a tool bar or tractor. This bed shaper includes a 14 inch disc and a 22 inch steel shank, treated to resist wear and tear through a garden or field. Combine two steel assemblies to efficiently form soil mounds in one pass.

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Create a raised seedbed or bury root vegetables with a disc hiller assembly. This 14 inch Blanton style bed shaper has a 22 inch long shank with a four bolt on 5 inch pattern. It is created to withstand continuous use and weathering and can be attached to a tool bar in a set of two to create seeding mounds.

The solid 22 inch steel shank connected to the disc measures 1-3/16 inches in diameter. The width of each disc assembly can be adjusted to particular specifications.

Specifications

  • 14 in. disc hiller with 22 in. shank
  • Shank diameter: 1-3/16 in.
  • Steel construction
  • Blanton style hub with 4 holes
  • Hub hole spacing: 5/16 in. square bolts on 5 in. pattern
  • Replacement blade, ASC #25900
  • Replacement shank, ASC #30336
  • Replacement hub, ASC #11679
  • Replacement bearings use 17849 (requires 2)
  • Replacement snap ring, ASC #27936

  • Make sure to look at the variety of disc hillers we offer in case this one does not suit your needs.

      DISC HILLER 14" W/ 22" SHANK in Disc Hillers and Tillage at Agri Supply ®.

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    Review Summary (Based on 1 Reviews)

     

    Customer Reviews

    5 Stars Nice Accessory - Good Value for the Price

    Yes

    Eugene H Beach Jr from MI wrote (May 11, 2014):

    I bought a pair of these to install in place of two tine holders on my old Ferguson SKO-20 spring tine harrow. The shanks were just the right length and diameter to fit the U-bolts which hold them in place. The bearing on one disc was a bit "stiff" but started to turn freely after a few practice passes through the garden. I set the discs so the lower edges were 1-2 inches below the remaining sweeps. This lets me make a nice hill with the discs while the tines wipe out the tire tracks and level the soil on either side of the ridge. Regardless of what set-up you use I'd recommend taking the time to experiment with the spacing between the discs, their angle, implement depth setting and tractor speed, since all of these will affect the height, width and slope of the resulting hill. Once I had a set-up that gave me the results I wanted I scribed some witnesses marks on the shanks so I could easily reposition everything the same way again. I plan to remove the hiller discs after planting so I can cultivate b